Tag Archives: compassion

Discipling our Children

Bible ReadingWe need a mature mindset when it comes to disciplining ourselves and the little people we are responsible for (our children). Somehow, we find no problems saying, Yes, you HAVE to eat your vegetables, you HAVE to brush your teeth, you HAVE to share, HAVE to apologize. These things are non-negotiable. We parents realize that we are responsible for our children’s health and attitudes in their youth, with the goal of cultivating life-long responsibility in our kids. Why is it then, that we have such difficulty in helping our children develop habits such as daily Bible-reading, prayer, worship, and thankfulness? What about teaching them to discipline themselves through occasional but regular periods of fasting, even if it’s only for one meal? What about charitable giving? Volunteering? Reaching out to others? Shouldn’t we make these things a regular part of their lives so that they will have some clue as to how to function as real Christians?

What do I mean by real Christians? The word Christian is an old one, and originally it meant “little Christs.” It may have even been a derogatory term when it was used by the citizens of Antioch to label followers of Christ. I’d like to think that Christians earned this term because of their adherence to a lifestyle that mimicked Christ’s. Therefore, I maintain that Christianity should be more than just a belief. More than just an acceptance of the Gospel. True, our works don’t get us into heaven, and the definition of the word “Christian” has changed over time, but our belief and acceptance should be made obvious by the changes that salvation works in us.

You might argue that your children haven’t personally accepted Christ yet, and that’s okay, I get that. But the goal is to direct them to seek out the true God and develop a relationship with Him. There’s nothing wrong with running your household in a way that presupposes their eventual acceptance. Even if your children never accept Him and grow up thinking you’re a crazy fanatic, there’s certainly nothing wrong with teaching them to love people and sincerely seek the truth.

Even for parents who have no qualms with “pushing” their religion onto their kids, many still fail to instill Christian discipline in their offspring. I think one of the main reasons is this: we refuse to discipline ourselves and therefore feel like hypocrites when we require them to read their Bibles, etc. If we demand that our kids return the candy bar they stole, yet we ourselves cheat on our taxes, what does that say about us? How can we pass on traits such as sharing, self-discipline, fasting, etc. if we can’t be bothered with these things in our own lives? Well, I only have one answer for that – seek discipline in your own life and set the example. But being an example isn’t enough; we need to help our kids practice for a lifetime of Christianity.

None of us are perfect, and we’re going to fail – a lot – but that doesn’t excuse us from trying our best. You expect a good effort from your kids on all sorts of things – keeping their rooms clean, obedience, education. Expect the best from yourself while you’re at it.

Anyway, rant over.

Here are a few things I find lacking in Christian society today:

1. Sincerity

2. Discipline

3. Obedience

4. Compassion

I have a few thoughts about each, but I will save them for another post.

photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/20777644@N05/6185795894″>Bible Study</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

Advertisements

Doing Virtuous Business by Theodore Roosevelt Malloch

Recently, I read Doing Virtuous Business by Theodore Roosevelt Malloch. On page 10, Mr. Malloch suggests that virtue is the root of business success, and throughout the rest of the book, he gives many examples to support this idea. He encourages employers to realize that people are spiritual beings (pg. 20) and to treat them as such. The book is filled with all kinds of practical applications and examples of virtue in business, and how those virtues contributed to the growth and success of known companies.

I truly enjoyed reading this book; the author shares his well-worded wisdom on nearly every page. He has a lot to say about treating people as equals, and not merely as a means to an end. In fact, on page 60 he states that, “You honor God by respecting his image, which is the human person.” Later, he shares something that all of us could stand to live by: “…the object of compassion is this person, here and now – the one whom you come across and whose need calls out to you (pg. 100).” I had a few complaints, but all in all, I’m very glad to have read it. I believe it should be read by every businessman.

If you want to find out more, check out the product page for this book. Or you can preview it here.

Note: In  exchange for an honest review, the publisher provided a complimentary copy of this book through BookSneeze®.